Time to check your insurance policies

With Hurricanes to the left and right of us, maybe a review of your home owner’s insurance policy makes sense. You may find out that at today’s real estate values, you are under-insured.

If you are like me, the last time you visited the insurance subject was during the Katrina/Sandy hurricanes. Since then, houses in some areas have appreciated by more than 30%. If so, a devastating event such as the widespread destruction recently caused by Harvey in Texas and Irma in Florida could really decimate what is probably your most valuable asset.

Given the fact that hurricanes seem to be sprouting up all over the place, if you have been spared thus far doesn’t mean that you will miss the next one. The sad facts are that according to a real estate data company (Core Logic), over half of all homeowner insurance policies have a payout that is less than the cost of rebuilding a home in the event of a catastrophic loss.

Remember, too, that for most homeowners, the insurance policies you have purchased automatically low-ball the replacement cost values of your home. As far as the insurance industry is concerned, it is your responsibility to make sure you have the appropriate amount of protection.

And as a starter, did you know that most home owner’s insurance offers limited coverage for hurricane and tropical storm damage? If you want something like hurricane coverage, it often comes with its own high deductible.  In some coastal areas, you may need to purchase separate windstorm coverage.

“It is important to know,” says Michelle V. Orlando, President of Cross Surety, Inc, an all-encompassing insurance company based in the Berkshires, “that most homeowner’s policies will not cover damage resulting from flood. A separate flood policy would be needed but there is typically a thirty-day window before coverage can be put into place.

In general, flood and wind damage are considered separate events and are rarely covered under one policy. And unfortunately, most people in hurricane zones don’t qualify for flood insurance. For that, you have to go to FEMA.

What can you do now (besides reviewing your policy and calling your agent) to prepare for a hurricane or flood in your area? Document your property. It should have been done a long time ago, but even if you did, I am sure you have made new purchases, improvements, etc. In the day of cell phone photos, it is also a good idea to photograph certain valuable pieces of property or possessions. Make sure all your outside items are stored inside. Park your vehicles in the garage and move anything near trees to a safer spot.

But let’s say you do get hit by a weather-related event. Be quick to file your claims. And when you do, take careful notes, write down all claim numbers; keep the insurance adjuster’s name and phone number. If you have out-of-pocket expenses for immediate repairs or hotel bills (in the event you are forced out of your home), make sure you keep the receipts.

Of course, for those who live in parts of Texas or Florida, it is too late to protect yourself. These homeowners have unfortunately learned a hard lesson. While they may have saved on premiums, due to a low replacement cost, they may have lost thousands, if not everything, as a result. Don’t be penny-wise with your insurance, because the next storm might pound you into oblivion.

P.S.: for those living in the Northeast, you may want to call your insurance agent today. Reports are that Hurricane Maria may be taking aim at the Northeast by sometime next week.

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